What to do about cracks?

Hello!

I plan on re-turfing very soon, and I just noticed these little cracks in my tray of my SN. Just looking for some insight from of you guys. Should I just fill it with epoxy before turfing it again? What type of epoxy to use? Also, in case I find bigger cracks when turfing, how do you know when you have to glass vs just epoxy?

Thanks,
 

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brapperdoodle

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Location
Asheville, NC
Epoxy will just crack again quickly. Chances are, your riding will only get more aggressive. I would glass that with a 4" wide strip at the least... The real problem is the extra weight from water in the tray!
 
oh hey brapp, i just went through your SN build this morning haha. That thing turned out so freaking sweet! Loved your custom tray work, some of the coolest stuff i've seen in my limited time of scrolling around on here! Great documentation.

Ok so back on track: perfect! That's kinda what I was looking for, thanks. I've never glassed anything before but I'm pretty sure I could pull this off. Any recommendations for which fiber/resin to get? Any good resources out there for spec-ing this stuff? When is it a good idea to epoxy?

And yeah i know, the thing's probably swamped by now, but I'm definitely not confident in myself enough to try de-foaming quite yet :p. Plus I'm still having fun on it as it is (this is my first ski, bought last month). Maybe in a few months i'll get the cajones to try it out haha

Sorry, lots of questions as I'm still pretty new to the scene lol,
 

brapperdoodle

Site Supporter
Location
Asheville, NC
Thanks man! Laying basic glass isn't hard, but it takes patience and prep work. If you want to add some beef to your tray area, you could order some 1208 bi-axial fiberglass mat. It is usually sold by the yard, so 1 yard would probably be fine for you. If you plan on doing any re-enforcement later, maybe grab a couple extra yards. 1208 is pretty strong, 1708 is stronger. Just depends how much strength you want to add. I used alot of 1708 but would have used 1208 in hindsight. You will also want to use ONLY 100% epoxy resin. The resin is sold for different temperatures and cure times. I used the 3:1 epoxy resin from U.S. Composites. They have a website but it is best to call and order. You will probably want to add some Cabosil to your order for a thickening agent. I would also recommend buying some pigment for the resin, this is so you can add color to the resin. White works very well and will help repairs look a bit cleaner. If you have any more questions, don't be afraid to ask! Before I built my SN, I had to have somebody answer all the same questions you are asking yourself haha
 
Okay sweet! How come you would rather have used 1208? Lighter weight in the end or easier to work? And if I'm gonna do one spot I might as well do some extra reinforcement, would you recommend just going around the bottom corner of the tray, then the center flat part?

Ok for prep, I can look more into that on youtube or something, but is it basically just sanding everything down so you're not glassing onto the gel coat? Any good tools that make life easier with that, and do you sand all the way down to the old glass?

Pigment sounds like a good plan! Do I need to top it with a coating of anything?

thanks for the help man!
 

brapperdoodle

Site Supporter
Location
Asheville, NC
Yes 1208 is lighter and easier to work with. The reason I would not add too much glass to the cracks is because if you ever want to cut it open and really fix it, you might create more work for yourself (sanding or cutting)

Yes, just sand past the gelcoat, get a nice bare fiberglass surface and wipe thoroughly with acetone. Just make sure there is no residue or junk where you will lay the glass.

No top coat on the resin, when you mix your resin you will add the corresponding amount of pigment into the resin as you mix it. That is also the time when you will add a thickening agent if needed. You will usually want to add the thickener if you are applying resin to a vertical surface. I would do 1 side at a time and position the hull so that the crack is at the bottom of the "V" any extra resin will pool in the crack. You don't want to use alot of resin, the less the better. Paint the surface where the glass is to be applied with the resin, wait 20-30 minutes or until the resin starts to get "tacky" and then lay the dry pre-cut glass onto the area. Mix a new batch of resin and lightly wet the cloth that you just laid down. You want it to completely penetrate, but not pool up and be totally soaked. I usually dab the glass with the brush. Harbor Freight sells boxes of 2" chip brushes for cheap and they work great for applying resin. If you make an order through U.S. Composites, get a small roller too, it makes getting the corners easy and getting bubbles out easy. You will have some time to work with the glass and resin, it can be pushed around a bit but not extreme. Just try to get out any bubbles and make it as smooth as possible.

P.S. Clean your roller with acetone immediately after use! If not, you'll be buying another one ;)
 
Oh also a couple more. How many layers would you do for cracks, how many for re-glassing the tray? Is the time between layers that 20-30 mins/until tacky?
 

brapperdoodle

Site Supporter
Location
Asheville, NC
Sweet. Ok that sounds doable. Hand and sand paper enough to sand it down or do you pretty much need some power?
Oh also a couple more. How many layers would you do for cracks, how many for re-glassing the tray? Is the time between layers that 20-30 mins/until tacky?

Yes you will need power tools and also some hand sanding in areas. I would just do 1 layer of that 1208 on the cracks in the tray, for now. Like I said, I wouldn't do more just because it might cause more cutting or sanding later. I would use at least 2 layers for your tray if you cut it out to fix it.
 

brapperdoodle

Site Supporter
Location
Asheville, NC
That is true, @Sanoman taught me everything I know :) (not kidding)

But to elaborate on that, cracks should usually be ground with a "V" making the crack surface a little bit wider so the resin has more area to grab. Not through the crack, but on both sides of the crack. The crack would then be the thinnest part, and each side would graduate up to the full thickness of the tray. Also I completely forgot to mention that drilling a hole at the end of a crack will stop it from spreading. You might think grinding your crack wider and drilling holes is a bad idea, but it will give the new resin and glass a place to grab and hold. Rather than the repair being "on top" of the crack, it is now "one with the crack" haha

I am not an expert, I am only trying to give a good description of the general process to make a repair. If I missed anything or made a mistake, chime in and let us know!
 
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