Super Jet Tuning a Protec pipe (presumed to be Mach 1)

Hey guys, maybe I just suck at looking things up, but I can't find much info about the Protec pipes in regards to what each of the 2 adj. screw on the head pipe do, what a good starting point is for them, temp to run the pipe at (or even where to measure) or just tuning info in general. Forgive my ignorance, I'm learning...
Ps: the setup runs good, I didn't tune it, just want to understand/learn how to run it for optimal performance.
PXL_20201213_031113207.jpgPXL_20201213_031104312.jpgPXL_20201213_031043367.jpg
 

Big Kahuna

Administrator
Location
Tuscaloosa, AL
The screw closer to the manifold should help with tuning for low end power. The one farther away should adjust for higher RPM's. Close both. Open the closer one 1/4 turn and test. Then swap settings. Also contact ProTec. They are still in business and can send you tuning instructions.
 

brapperdoodle

Site Supporter
Location
Asheville, NC
I couldn't find this last night but I did some research a couple months back about this type of thing. Im sure you probably understand how a 2-cycle expansion chamber works but when I read more about how the sonic wave acts, it really made me think. This might be helpful, it was for me!

 
The screw closer to the manifold should help with tuning for low end power. The one farther away should adjust for higher RPM's. Close both. Open the closer one 1/4 turn and test. Then swap settings. Also contact ProTec. They are still in business and can send you tuning instructions.
Thanks! I'll give it a shot. I'll reach out to Protec and see what they say. Does it hurt anything to run with both closed? Or does it only affect performance? Guess I just want to know if I'm running the risk of overheating/ruining anything by playing with settings.

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brapperdoodle

Site Supporter
Location
Asheville, NC
Just a brief description, The water entering the pipe will cool the exhaust gasses and change the acoustic wave or "sonic wave" causing a change in how much of the unburnt exhaust gasses re-enter the cylinder for compression. Depending on where and how much water enter that pipe, it will thus change the power delivery giving the "tunable" pipe. I know there is more science and technicality in what I said, but that should be generally accurate. Plus, I love this image haha I stared at it for a while.

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brapperdoodle

Site Supporter
Location
Asheville, NC
Also, that pipe looks like its had some time on it. You might want to remove the adjustment screws and verify that they are not plugged up with carbon and are indeed flowing water. Then when installing the screws don't forget to use a proper thread sealant so they don't seize. I like Permatex brand : permatex-high-performance-thread-sealant

If the screws are stuck, heat them with a propane torch very hot, and let them cool off. Do that a few times before really trying to get them out. Hope this helps!
 
Just a brief description, The water entering the pipe will cool the exhaust gasses and change the acoustic wave or "sonic wave" causing a change in how much of the unburnt exhaust gasses re-enter the cylinder for compression. Depending on where and how much water enter that pipe, it will thus change the power delivery giving the "tunable" pipe. I know there is more science and technicality in what I said, but that should be generally accurate. Plus, I love this image haha I stared at it for a while.

View attachment 405540
Nice visual! Also the simple explanation is appreciated. Found myself reading stuff where I had to look up half the words... ^This makes sense to me. Things are starting to make more sense in my little head.
So far, this is what I'm getting:
-Having at least one of the screws open to a set minimum to ensure pipe doesn't get too hot (melt couplers)
-How injecting water at different location in the pipe has different effects on gasses re-entering/compression/power delivery
 
Also, that pipe looks like its had some time on it. You might want to remove the adjustment screws and verify that they are not plugged up with carbon and are indeed flowing water. Then when installing the screws don't forget to use a proper thread sealant so they don't seize. I like Permatex brand : permatex-high-performance-thread-sealant

If the screws are stuck, heat them with a propane torch very hot, and let them cool off. Do that a few times before really trying to get them out. Hope this helps!
will do. Got lots of time for maintenance. Lakes are frozen for another couple months here.
 
Ok, so I've been reading and I just want to clarify I understand correctly.
-the headpipe cooling (manifold to coupler) is constant and not adjustable.
-the adjustment screws control water injection from headpipe cooling jacket into pipe, hence affecting temp of chamber (rubber coupler to stinger) which affects the sonic waves in there

Also, is that a good spot to have my temp sticker on the chamber?
Any thoughts on adding a FCV between headpipe and stinger (got an aftermarket waterbox if that makes a difference)? (Been reading some stuff about it) need to add a tee to a pisser if I do that?

I appreciate the help.


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Big Kahuna

Administrator
Location
Tuscaloosa, AL
Yes, The adjustment screws help to tune the temperature of the exhaust which changes the sonic waves, Speeds up, Slows Down, It all in the settings of the screws. One will help low end, the other top end. But not both. Dont worry with the FCV until after you get pipe tuned.
 
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