Wifi Extenders

Big Kahuna

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#1
We have some dead spots where we have trouble getting wifi. Looking at Extenders. Any of you got experience with any? Recommendations?

Edit. This is mainly for cellphones, tablets, laptops. Our bedroom is a dead zone. Sometimes we can get wifi, half time it real slow.
 
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Joined
Jul 30, 2015
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Sacramento Delta
#4
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smokeysevin

one man with a couch
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Apr 17, 2013
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Location
Houston
#5
Powerline adapters work really well, the extenders did not in our house.

We have the tp link version of both.

Sean

Sent from my LM-G710 using Tapatalk
 

Big Kahuna

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#6
Am i understanding that you run data cables from router to the plugs where TV' are plugged in? This does not help with lack of signal for our phones or laptops.
 
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#7
Thank you Smokey for sharing your experience!

My new friend, Smokey, will explain it better than me.

1. You run Romex house 120v AC wiring to an outlet (or use existing outlet if you are lucky, see below) to the transmitter powerline adapter and plug it in.
2. You plug the receiver powerline adapter into the 120v AC outlet next to your router.
3. You run an Ethernet cable from the receiver powerline adapter to your router.
4. Your laptop or camera connects to your transmitter powerline adapter via wifi.
5. The wifi signal is sent via the hard wire 120v AC house wiring to the receiver powerline adapter.
6. The receiver powerline adapter sends the signal to your router via the Ethernet cable.

So, the wifi portion is very short.
The 120v AC wired portion can be very long.
There should not be a subpanel or a circuit breaker between the 120v AC wiring from the transmitter powerline adapter to the 120v AC wiring to the receiver powerline adapter and both the transmitter and receiver should be on the same side bus bar in your main panel. All of these concerns are alleviated if you run a dedicated circuit/wiring from your panel to your router and then branch out to your receiver powerline adapters from there. That is what I planned to do.

Hence I was going to run a dedicate circuit for the router and powerline(s) -- yes you can have more than one receiver powerline adapter on the circuit.

In these hard times we would all do well to watch the 39 min. documentary called The Lady in 6.
Best movie of all time.

Oops! I forgot it was Sunday:
 
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smokeysevin

one man with a couch
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Houston
#8
I have mine setup :

Fiber from outside box-> house wall-> modem-> router-> ethernet cable -> powerline adapter -> wall outlet. Then you plug the other adapter into another wall outlet. Then it goes wall outlet -> powerline adapter -> ethernet cable -> device.

Sean


 

smoofers

Rockin' the SQUARE!!!!
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Granbury, TX
#9
You need to look into a MESH router system. Multiple access points that communicate with each other and spread your network out as far as you need it. You can start with a basic 2 or 3 satellite system and add as many as you need. I using the Linksys VELOP system and it is amazing and super simple to set up. It also lets you prioritize up to 3 devices to get the fastest speeds to them.

https://www.linksys.com/us/velop/??cb=
 

Big Kahuna

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#10
I have mine setup :

Fiber from outside box-> house wall-> modem-> router-> ethernet cable -> powerline adapter -> wall outlet. Then you plug the other adapter into another wall outlet. Then it goes wall outlet -> powerline adapter -> ethernet cable -> device.

Sean


This not what we are looking for. Cell phones, tablets, kindles dont hook up to ethernet cables. This system does not seem to be what we need.
 
Joined
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Location
Michigan
#11
I just have the one (good) router. if you only want one or two single range extenders for a couple spots its not that big of a deal just to pickup a couple 20-40$ extenders. they are pretty easy setup these days
 

smokeysevin

one man with a couch
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Location
Houston
#12
This not what we are looking for. Cell phones, tablets, kindles dont hook up to ethernet cables. This system does not seem to be what we need.
I am aware of that, I mentioned in my first post that I had not had good luck with the range extenders. If you were to use a mesh network, you still need to run ethernet cables to each of the "pucks" the powerline adapters can simplify the setup.

Typically what would happen with the repeaters is that the phone/device would either not switch to the better signal strength device, or if I did switch, the repeater did not have internet access.

It could have been a ssid issue or something similar. I am not a networking guy but I did follow the setup instructions.

Ultimately, I just bought a higher powered router and placed it up higher on my desk which fixed our coverage issues.

Sean

Sent from my LM-G710 using Tapatalk
 
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Location
Sacramento Delta
#13
This not what we are looking for. Cell phones, tablets, kindles dont hook up to ethernet cables. This system does not seem to be what we need.
Edit: BK I linked to the wrong Powerline adapter. I should have linked this one:

https://www.tp-link.com/us/home-networking/powerline/tl-wpa8630-kit/

The TP-Link Powerline transmitter adapter is a "wifi" extender. Cell phones, tablets, kindles hook up to wifi, so they will hook up via wifi to the TP-Link Powerline transmitter adapter or to mesh extenders such as the Linksys mesh.

Smokey, what "higher powered router" did you buy?
 
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smoofers

Rockin' the SQUARE!!!!
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#14
I am aware of that, I mentioned in my first post that I had not had good luck with the range extenders. If you were to use a mesh network, you still need to run ethernet cables to each of the "pucks" the powerline adapters can simplify the setup.

Typically what would happen with the repeaters is that the phone/device would either not switch to the better signal strength device, or if I did switch, the repeater did not have internet access.

It could have been a ssid issue or something similar. I am not a networking guy but I did follow the setup instructions.

Ultimately, I just bought a higher powered router and placed it up higher on my desk which fixed our coverage issues.

Sean

Sent from my LM-G710 using Tapatalk
Only the first puck is connected to the line. Everything else is wireless.
 

smokeysevin

one man with a couch
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Apr 17, 2013
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Location
Houston
#15
Edit: BK I linked to the wrong Powerline adapter. I should have linked this one:

https://www.tp-link.com/us/home-networking/powerline/tl-wpa8630-kit/

The TP-Link Powerline transmitter adapter is a "wifi" extender. Cell phones, tablets, kindles hook up to wifi, so they will hook up via wifi to the TP-Link Powerline transmitter adapter or to mesh extenders such as the Linksys mesh.

Smokey, what "higher powered router" did you buy?
I was using an asus rt66au and switched to an asus ac3100 dual.

Strictly speaking, its not more powerful, it has an extra band and supposedly better antennas.

Sean
 
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OCD Solutions

Original, Clean and Dependable Solutions
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Savannah, GA
#17
We tried a three point Eeros mesh system in our current home when we first moved in and never could get it to work right.
We have quite a bit of square footage, a second story so we thought it would be perfect.
Tech support said we had them too close together and our floorplan was just too open and so we got too much feedback between access points.

We bought another single point Linksys EA9300 and have had zero complaints.
My wife gets great signal strength in her upstairs office as do I out in the garage.

Layout and construction will play a huge roll in coverage but so will placement of the router.

The higher frequency carries further but the Low frequency penetrates walls better. So if you have a dead zone, choose 2.4Ghz over 5 for a better result.
 
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California
#18
I have the ubiquity unify and am not impressed. I’m in the living room that’s connected to the garage and the unify in the garage is just average strength.
 
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