Career Change Advice / Opinions

SXIPro

JM781 Big Bore
Joined
Mar 17, 2006
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1,831
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Here on the 'X' mostly
#21
Nope just went for it. Did 2 years of night school, then my employer worked with me on scheduling when I started nursing school. I used my charm and good looks to work my way into a level 1 trauma center Emergency department and thats part of why my pay is so low. But the experience is worth it in the long run and hopefully I can go back to the lil country hospital I worked at and name my price.
Maybe try the male escort industry......
 
Joined
May 17, 2012
Likes
7
Location
Granite Falls, Wa
#22
Have you ever thought of changing from automotive mechanic to a diesel mechanic, or even a fleet mechanic? I'd say try to work for a municipality. When I graduated tech school with an ASM degree, I said I'd never work flat rate. I got my first fleet job at 21 years old, and then moved onto another job a few years back. We take care of everything from upfitting million dollar prices of equipment to working on a chainsaw. And the pressure, stress and pay is all the same. I live in Washington so the pay here is really good, not sure of your city, county, state, public power, EMS/firefighting agency's pay, but her they all pay premium. We have a fleet of over 1,000 so nothing is the same, you have knowledge of automotive so your skill set it sufficient if you want to learn heavy diesel, equipment ECT. The kicker is most will pay for schooling up to a certain amount per year, as long as it pertains to anything that the municipality employs... I take a quarter every year of fabrication, cnc operator, or last year I did aerospace fabrication (aka fiberglass and carbon fiber). All paid for. You might just change fields, and not whole careers, put that college degree to work. And learn on someone else's dime what you might want to do.
 
Joined
May 31, 2009
Likes
197
Location
Hudsonville, MI
#23
Have you ever thought of changing from automotive mechanic to a diesel mechanic, or even a fleet mechanic? I'd say try to work for a municipality. When I graduated tech school with an ASM degree, I said I'd never work flat rate. I got my first fleet job at 21 years old, and then moved onto another job a few years back. We take care of everything from upfitting million dollar prices of equipment to working on a chainsaw. And the pressure, stress and pay is all the same. I live in Washington so the pay here is really good, not sure of your city, county, state, public power, EMS/firefighting agency's pay, but her they all pay premium. We have a fleet of over 1,000 so nothing is the same, you have knowledge of automotive so your skill set it sufficient if you want to learn heavy diesel, equipment ECT. The kicker is most will pay for schooling up to a certain amount per year, as long as it pertains to anything that the municipality employs... I take a quarter every year of fabrication, cnc operator, or last year I did aerospace fabrication (aka fiberglass and carbon fiber). All paid for. You might just change fields, and not whole careers, put that college degree to work. And learn on someone else's dime what you might want to do.
Some variety would be nice. I would like to find something a little less abusive on my body though. Fire trucks and stuff could be interesting, I think there is only one company kind of local that works on those. My current job is mostly commission based, which works out pretty good most of the time, but I’m constantly worried about the service advisors screwing up my time.
 

Vumad

Super Hero, with a cape!
Joined
Jun 21, 2007
Likes
2,658
Location
St. Pete, FL
#24
Thanks for taking the time to write such a response!
I have a Bachelors in Automotive Management and an Associates in Automotive Service, both of which are quite specific. I’m married with 2 kids, so school full time isn’t really an option. We love my kids school, so we don’t really want to move, but I wouldn’t be opposed if I could get my wife on board with it. I’m starting to look for something with forensic investigation or automotive accident reconstruction, but I have to figure out what kind of school/training/certifications are required for that.
I got class work done with an infant by sitting in the hallway of the YMCA while they watched my kids for up to 2 hours so I could work out. Brain is a muscle, right? They provide tables and coffee so must be. I was part time though, but if you really want it, weigh the opportunity costs and do what you want to do.

Have you ever thought of changing from automotive mechanic to a diesel mechanic, or even a fleet mechanic? I'd say try to work for a municipality. When I graduated tech school with an ASM degree, I said I'd never work flat rate. I got my first fleet job at 21 years old, and then moved onto another job a few years back. We take care of everything from upfitting million dollar prices of equipment to working on a chainsaw. And the pressure, stress and pay is all the same. I live in Washington so the pay here is really good, not sure of your city, county, state, public power, EMS/firefighting agency's pay, but her they all pay premium. We have a fleet of over 1,000 so nothing is the same, you have knowledge of automotive so your skill set it sufficient if you want to learn heavy diesel, equipment ECT. The kicker is most will pay for schooling up to a certain amount per year, as long as it pertains to anything that the municipality employs... I take a quarter every year of fabrication, cnc operator, or last year I did aerospace fabrication (aka fiberglass and carbon fiber). All paid for. You might just change fields, and not whole careers, put that college degree to work. And learn on someone else's dime what you might want to do.
This is very good advice. Municipal jobs are hard to come by, especially as the economy trends downwards. Switching careers and hoping for a job is okay if necessary but switching jobs and putting your foot in the door for a career change is a good plan. If they wont hire you to do something you are already an expert in, why would they hire you for something you just tried to learn. And unfortunately the education system lets so many people skate by that educational level is too often just white noise.
 
Joined
May 17, 2012
Likes
7
Location
Granite Falls, Wa
#26
I know people that work there. Around here it's tough because they still have a pension for a retirement, and higher wages than all the other delivery drivers.... My advise is, if you don't get the job the first time, apply every time until you do or you find something better. Don't get discouraged.
 
Joined
May 31, 2009
Likes
197
Location
Hudsonville, MI
#27
I know people that work there. Around here it's tough because they still have a pension for a retirement, and higher wages than all the other delivery drivers.... My advise is, if you don't get the job the first time, apply every time until you do or you find something better. Don't get discouraged.
Yeah I’ll keep applying if necessary. I’m waiting to hear back potentially on a time to schedule an in-person appointment/interview.
 
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